Sunday, 21 March 2021

4 ways to work into a crochet stitch

Namaste friends,

I hope your life is flourishing in the “new normal” which was a gift from 2020.

Yes, 2020 was a tough year that left no one unscathed regardless of age, sex, race, wealth or profession!

It was also a year of learning, adjustment and innovation.

For me personally it meant doing something I love in a very different manner.

And that is teaching crochet. I love Crochet and I consider it a Life Skill rather than a craft and I think everybody should know how to crochet.

Since I couldn’t carry on with my in-person classes I had to learn how to take my classes online. At first, I was adamant that it was not possible but my family egged me on and I am so glad they did.

My students enjoyed the classes and sent me cute pictures of their projects upon completion of the course.

But, the most frequently asked beginner question was “Where do I insert the hook?”

Hence this post! :)

* This post contains affiliate links which if you use for any purchase, may yield me a small commission, at no extra cost to you. Thank you.

Now let us see the anatomy of a crochet stitch.

Parts of a crochet stitch

Firstly we have the Top of the stitch which looks like a little “v” also simply called “the stitch”.

The V consists of two loops, the loop closest to you is called the Front loop and the loop facing away from you is called the Back loop. 

This naming of the loops has nothing to do with the right side (front) of your project or the wrong side (back) of your project.

Then we have the Post or body of the stitch. The size of the post depends on the stitch made ie: single crochet, half double crochet or double crochet etc.

Lastly there is the base of the stitch, the place where the stitch originates, the part that is worked into the stitch or space below.

Normally when making a stitch we will insert our hook under Both loops of the V. This is an unspoken rule and holds true for all crochet patterns, unless the pattern mentions otherwise.


crochet under both loops

Here is a row of Dc stitches worked in both loops.


DC in both loops

If the pattern says work in “front loop only”, the hook is inserted in the loop closest to you, like so:

crochet in front loop only

And this is how it looks on the side you worked:

crochet in front loop only

and on the wrong side of the row:

dc in front loop

The unused back loop forms a ridge at the back.

If the pattern mentions work in “back loop only”, the hook is inserted in the loop away from you like so:

work in back loop crochet

And this is how it looks on the side you worked:

The unused front loops form a ridge in front.

And this is the wrong side of the row:

dc in back loop wrong side

Front loop and back loop stitches create ridges and are used to add texture to the item as in this "Single crochet in back loop only" ribbing for example.

scblo ribbing

In some patterns, after working one round in the front loops the next round is worked in the back loops to give a lovely 3D effect.

I have used this method in this clasp purse and crocheted in the loops separately to enclose the frame of the purse between the stitches so that the holes in the frame are not visible from any side.

crochet clasp purse

And now surprise surprise there is a third loop too! Right behind the “V” and it is a horizontal loop and looks like this:

work in horizontal loop

Working in the third loop produces even more texture as it pushes the whole V to the front.

As you can see it in the Camel stitch. I have used the camel stitch as an edging for the Harmony Cowl which you can see HERE.

hdc in third loop

Wow, you are still with me! Thank you for your time. 
I hope you enjoyed this post and found it useful.

If your crochet item does not look like the picture given in the pattern, read the pattern once again and check if you made your stitches in the correct loop. :)

In the next post I will discuss about using the post and the base of the stitch.

Is there a crochet stitch/technique that you would like to know more about? Any questions, suggestions and comments are most welcome.

Happy crocheting! :)

* This post contains affiliate links which if you use for any purchase, may yield me a small commission, at no extra cost to you. Thank you.

Saturday, 13 March 2021

Crochet Flora Beanie Free Pattern

Namaste friends!

I hope and pray that 2021 has begun well for you. And that you and your loved ones are safe and healthy.

March is National Crochet Month so I had to share a pattern. :)

I am a big fan of matchy-matchy, so this hat pattern was written to match my Cluster stitch cowl pattern.

Flora beanie free pattern crochetkari

Usually, I crochet top-down hats, starting with a flat circle made using DCs. I keep increasing the circle till I get the stitch count I want for the stitch pattern I have selected, as you can see in the Brooke beanie.

For this hat, I wanted to start the stitch pattern from the crown/top so after a few attempts I got it right! 

Turns out you have to increase the clusters just as you increase the DCs. And here I was trying to reinvent the wheel. :) 

Flora beanie pattern crochetkari


So here goes the Flora crochet beanie pattern.

Skill Level:  Easy

Size: Hat measures approximately 20 inches (51 cms) around

and 8.5 inches (22 cms) in height. (Adult size)

Materials:

  • DK weight yarn around 70 – 75 gms/ 2.65 oz

  • Hook – US G or 6 (4 mm), UK 8

Gauge:  8 rounds and 8 clusters = 4” by 4” in Cluster pattern.

Notes: This pattern uses US terminology.

            The hat is worked top-down, in the round without turning.

Abbreviations:

beg – beginning,

ch - chain,

st – stitch,

sp – space,

sl st – slip stitch,

dc – double crochet,

yo – yarn over hook,

fpdc – front post double crochet,

bpdc – back post double crochet,

Pattern stitches:

Cl: 3 dc cluster - Into the ch-1 space indicated, yo, insert hook in sp, yo, pull through st, yo, pull through 2 loops on hook, (yo, insert hook in same sp, yo, pull through, yo, pull through 2 loops on hook) twice, yo, pull through all 4 loops on hook.

1st cl: ch 2, dc2tog into same st as sl st counts as 1st cluster.


Instructions:

The Flora beanie is worked top-down, so we start at the top of the crown.

  • Round 1: Ch 4, join with sl st to form ring.

  • Round 2: Ch 3, 11 dc into ring, join with slip stitch in 3rd chain of beg ch 3. (12 dc)

  • Round 3: (ch 2, dc2tog) in same st as sl st – counts as 1st cl, (ch 1, cl in next st) 11 times, ch 1, join with sl st in 1st cl. (12 clusters, 12 ch-1 sps)

  • Round 4: Sl st into nxt ch-1 sp, (ch 2, dc2tog) in same sp as sl st, ch 1, sk 1, (cl, ch1, cl) in nxt sp, * ch 1, sk 1, Cl in nxt sp, ch 1, sk 1, (cl, ch 1, cl) in nxt sp, rep from * 4 times, ch 1, sk 1, join with slip st in 1st cl.  (18 clusters, 18 ch-1 sps)

  • Round 5: Sl st into nxt ch-1 sp, (ch 2, dc2tog)  in same sp as sl st, ch 1, sk 1, (cl, ch 1, cl) in nxt ch-1 sp, ch 1, sk 1, *cl in nxt ch-1 sp, ch 1, sk 1, cl in nxt sp, ch 1, sk 1, (cl, ch 1, cl) in nxt sp, ch 1 sk 1, rep frm* 4 times, cl in nxt sp, ch 1, sk 1, join with sl st in 1st cl.       (24 cl, 24 ch-1 sps)

  • Round 6: Sl st into nxt ch-1 sp, (ch 2, dc2tog)  in same sp as sl st, ch 1, sk 1, (cl, ch 1, cl) in nxt sp, ch 1, sk 1, * [cl in nxt sp, ch 1, sk 1,] 3 times, ch 1, sk 1, (cl, ch 1, cl) in nxt sp, ch 1 sk 1, rep frm* 4 times, cl in nxt sp, ch 1, sk 1, cl in nxt sp, ch 1, sk 1, join with sl st in 1st cl. (30 cl, 30 ch-1 sps)

  • Round 7: Sl st into nxt ch-1 sp, (ch 2, dc2tog)  in same sp as sl st, ch 1, sk 1, (cl, ch 1, cl) in nxt sp, ch 1, sk 1, *[cl in sp, ch 1, sk 1,] 4 times, ch 1, sk 1, (cl, ch 1, cl) in nxt sp, ch 1 sk 1, rep frm* 4 times, (cl in nxt sp, ch 1, sk 1,) 3 times, join with sl st in 1st cl.               (36 cl, 36 ch-1 sps)

  • Round 8: Sl st into nxt ch-1 sp, (ch 2, dc2tog)  in same sp as sl st, ch 1, sk 1, (cl, ch 1, cl) in nxt ch-1 sp, ch 1, sk 1, *[cl in nxt ch-1 sp, ch 1, sk 1,] 5 times, ch 1, sk 1, (cl, ch 1, cl) in nxt sp, ch 1 sk 1, rep frm* 4 times, (cl in nxt sp, ch 1, sk 1,) 4 times, join with sl st in  1st cl. (42 cl, 42 ch-1 sps)

At the end of this round your circle should measure around 7 – 7.5 inches and this is where we stop increasing.

  • Round 9: Sl st into nxt ch-1 sp, (ch 2, dc2tog)  in same sp as sl st, ch 1, sk 1, * cl in nxt ch-1 sp, ch 1, sk 1, rep from * around, join with sl st in 1st cl.  (42 cl, 42 ch-1 sps)

  • Rounds 10 - 16: Repeat round 9.

Note: Work Rnd 9 as many times as required to get the height you want for the hat. Also, note that the ribbed brim will be around 1.5 – 2 inches.


Crochetkari Flora beanie pattern


To start Ribbed brim:

  I used a different colour for the brim but the same colour is fine too.

  • Round 17: Ch 3 (counts as dc), *dc in nxt sp, dc in nxt st, rep from * around, ending with sl st in top ch of beg ch 3. (84 dc)

  • Round 18: Ch 3, fpdc around nxt st, * bpdc around nxt st, fpdc around nxt st, rep from * around ending with sl st in top ch of beg ch 3.

  • Rounds 19 – 22: Repeat Round 18.

Add more rounds of ribbing if desired. Fasten off leaving a six inch tail. 

Weave in the tail using your hook or a sewing needle.

There, that's your Flora beanie done!


If you do find any mistakes in the pattern, be a dear and let me know.  :)

Stay home, stay safe, stay healthy. 

Heartfelt prayers and best wishes to you and your loved ones, where ever in the World you may be.







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